10 More Reasons to Love Woolly Wormhead

Following on from the success of ‘Painted Woolly Toppers‘, ‘Painted Woolly Toppers for Kids‘ features a further 10 hats designed especially for hand-dyed and variegated yarns. This collection continues to explore Woolly’s love of structural stitches and 3D form.

I adore making hats (check out my projects on Ravelry here) and this is probably for several reasons – they make really quick imageprojects to satisfy your cast on urges; they are a great way to learn new stitches and patterns without the big commitment of a sweaters worth of yarn; they are very portable so great for working on when you are travelling; and depending on the complexity of the pattern are easy to put down and pick up again.

Woolly Wormhead is a Hat Architect, renowned for her innovative design, attention to detail and well written patterns.

I have long been an admirer of Woolly’s designs and actually have most (if not all) of her books in my knitting library.  When I was lucky to get sent a copy of Painted Woolly Toppers for Kids to do a blog review I was blown away by the designs!

I had already decided to make friends kids hats for Christmas this year and was planning to start in Autumn (its not officially Autumn until 22nd September…isn’t that right Jaele!) so this was totally perfect timing. I’ve already several of the designs earmarked as gifts…and I actually went to cast on the first one today… but this plan was thwarted by the lack of 2.25mm circular’s in my tool box… which will be soon rectified.

So while I wait on Mr Postie delivering some needles lets have a closer look at the designs…

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Mobberley
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Modbury
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Kevinside
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Chesser
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Swinton
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Hadleigh
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Gorton
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Wychavon
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Allerton
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Kilbride

Aren’t the designs just stunning!

Woolly took all the images and as a budding photographer myself I can appreciate the way she has captured the models in a graphic pose without taking away from showing the detail of the hats – cause its all about the hats even if the models are very cute!

The dark background really makes the portraits pop and the use of the quirky props gives the images a unique edge. I think that’s what makes Woolly Wormhead hats stand out from the crowd – they are original designs!

An initial flick through the book and I can see straight away that each design comes in a good range of sizes with some up to 24 inches so adults can enjoy wearing these hats too!! The book layout is stylish but functional: you get great tutorial instructions, detailed schematics and clear information on gauge, materials and yarn required. All patterns are written and some also come with charts where appropriate.

The only downside I must point out is that the yarn colour used is not listed. Now I thought about this for a second and realised okay so most people look at an image and want to make hat with that exact yarn, but what Woolly has cleverly done is future proof her written instructions – colours tend be be discontinued more frequently than yarn bases so it means she is not suggesting a colour that you may not be able to get access to later down the road.

This book is really going to appeal to a wide range of knitters – those who love hats, those who love colour, those who love structure and technique; and perhaps those who love all of the above!!

So if you have a little person in your life or perhaps you have taken a shine to one of the designs for yourself (I know that I desperately need a Wychavon this Winter!) then you need to nip over here get a copy of the e-book here for an early bird price of £9.

The book will normally cost £10 for the e-book and £16.99 for a printed copy, via Magcloud.  In addition to the complete book, the designs will also be available as single designs too.

Remember to sign up for Woolly Wormhead’s Newsletter here to be kept up to date on the latest news, delivered straight to your inbox and please do follow her on twitter and instagram.

Woolly is ready for hat season…are you?

Please note that all images used in this post are copyright of Woolly Wormhead and have been used with kind permission. 

(c) 2016 Woolly Wormhead

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